Wednesday, April 22, 2009

It really was a Good Friday!

White County Historical Museum & Genealogical Society
Monticello, Indiana
April, 2009
Two weeks ago on Good Friday, my two youngest sons and I traveled to Monticello, Indiana. I was planning to visit several cemeteries in the hope of finding at least my Great Grandmother Rilda Hanaway's grave and possibly several others ancestors as well. On previous trips I didn't bring the names of the cemeteries or who may have been where....this time I was a little smarter and more prepared. My sons and I couldn't check into our hotel until 4 pm. so we decided to check out one particular cemetery I could easily find-the Old Monticello Cemetery where Eliza Hanaway, my 3rd Great Grandmother is buried there. Supposedly, so are three of her sons and her husband Jacob.
On the way to the cemetery I drove by the White County Historical Museum. On my previous trips it was never opened and being Good Friday I didn't give it a thought, until I saw an "Open" sign hanging in the window. BINGO, I couldn't find a parking spot fast enough.
There was supposed to be quite a bit of information on Jacob Hanaway in this museum and maybe I could find it! It turned out to be better than I could have imagined! I met my 4th cousin Judy Carol Baker who just happens to be the director of the museum! Wow, what a wonderful and very informative visit we had too! Judy gave me access to Jacob's will and better yet copied everything that I wanted copies of. She also provided me with copies of Benjamin and Nancy Hockenberry Bowsher my 3rd Great Grandparents! Cool!
Judy gave me directions to several cemeteries in the area and the next day I found Rilda's grave and her son Rollie's grave in the Yeoman cemetery. I found that Jacob shared the grave with his first wife Eliza for his name was on the other side of the tombstone. I found many Bowsher, Bunnell, Burns, and Cripe relatives in the Old Riverview Cemetery.
It certainly was a great trip! Now, all I have to do is download all the pictures of the tombstones, identify them and the cemetery I found them in.....especially before I forget all those little details!


5 comments:

Greta Koehl said...

What fabulous luck! I dream of having a genealogy field trip with that kind of success.

Cheryl Fleming Palmer said...

What an awesome day you had! Not many run across this kind of luck! Fun! That would be a great genealogy Happy Dance!

Cheryl Fleming Palmer said...

I've nominated you for the "One Lovely Blog" award.

Elizabeth said...

Great pictures, Taylorstales!

BTW, I've nominated your blog for the "One Lovely Blog" Award. See http://tinyurl.com/ostjft for details.

Becky Jamison said...

I've awarded you The Janice Brown Puckerbrush Blog Award for Excellence. Read it here and pass it on!
http://beckysgraceandglory.blogspot.com

The Family

The family. We were a strange little band of characters trudging through life sharing diseases and toothpaste, coveting one another's desserts, hiding shampoo, borrowing money, locking each other out of our rooms, inflicting pain and kissing to heal it in the same instant, loving, laughing, defending, and trying to figure out the common thread that bound us all together. ~Erma Bombeck

Genealogy Pox, author unknown

WARNING: GENEALOGY POX IS VERY CONTAGIOUS!

SYMPTOMS: Continual complaint as to need for names, dates and places. Patient has a blank expressions, sometimes deaf to spouse and children. Has no taste for work of any kind, except feverishly looking through records at libraries and courthouses.
Has a compulsion to write letters. Swears at mailman when he doesn't leave mail. Frequents strange places such as cemeteries, ruins, and remote desolate country areas. Makes secret night calls and hides phone bills from spouse. Mumbles to self. Has strange, faraway look in eyes.

NO KNOWN CURE!

TREATMENT: Medication is useless. This disease is not fatal, but gets progressively worse. Patient should attend genealogy workshops, subscribe to genealogical magazines and be given a quiet corner in the house where he/she can be alone.

REMARKS: The unusual nature of this disease is that the sicker the patient gets, the more he or she enjoys it!